Fraud Warning

Federal Trade Commission Video to Help Identity Theft Victims

Helping Victims of Identity Theft Video

If you’re a victim of identity theft or know someone who is, the Federal Trade Commission has a new video designed to help facilitators who assist consumers in repairing their identity.  Helping Victims of Identity Theft is the latest addition to the FTC’s library of resources that explain not only how to recognize identity theft, but also how to report it and repair the damage it can cause.  The FTC gets more complaints about identity theft each year than any other consumer issue, and estimates that nine million consumers become identity theft victims each year.

 

Protect Yourself from Online Scams

ID Theft VideoYour Security, Our Priority Video

Fraudulent activities should always be reported to your local law enforcement office. The following is additional information on how specific types of fraud complaints or cases of suspected fraud can be submitted to federal agencies.

Where Do Customers Go For HELP?

If a customer suspects they have given information to a phishers, it is important for them to act immediately. For information on how a customer can put a "fraud alert" on their files at the credit reporting bureaus, and for other advise for ID theft victims, contact the Federal Trade Commission’s ID Theft Clearinghouse at:

www.consumer.gov/idtheft or call 1-877-438-4338

Report any phishing ATTEMPTS by contacting the National Fraud Information Center/Internet Fraud Watch. Alert the company the phisher was impersonating, and their local law enforcement agency.

www.fraud.org or call 1-800-876-7060

05/23/12 -- Text messages, calls, and emails claiming to be from the Bank are being sent to unsuspecting customers requesting they 'reactivate' their debit card.  These messages are not and would not be sent by the bank.  Please disregard these requests.

02/15/2012- E-mail Claiming to be from the FDIC

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of fraudulent e-mails that have the appearance of being sent from the FDIC. While the e-mails exhibit variations in the "From" and "Subject" lines, the messages are similar. The fraudulent e-mails are meant to notify recipients that “Your ACH and Wire transaction abilities have been temporarily withhold for your security, because your security version expired.” They then instruct recipients to “Please download and install the updated installations” by clicking on a hyper-link provided (Note: the Web site addresses (URL) vary widely).

Finally, most of the e-mails then state, “As soon as you have installed it, your account transactions will be completely reinstated.” 

This e-mail and link are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should not click on the link provided. The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers or business account holders. 

For more information visit:
http://www.fdic.gov/consumers/consumer/alerts/ 

09/16/11 Callers Phishing for information using CSB's name
It has been reported that CenterState customers have been receiving fraudulent, automated calls, sometimes in the early morning purporting to be from CenterState Bank. This calls have a message that says your debit card account is at risk or locked out, and it asks you to enter passwords, PINs, account numbers and debit card expiration dates in order to resolve the problem.

If you receive this type of call, customers are advised to hang-up immediately and not give any account or other personal information if they receive this type of call.

CenterState Bank actively engages in fraud prevention activities that may result in calls being made to customers if unusual or potentially fraudulent activity occurs on an account. When these calls are placed, questions will be asked to verify your identity — such as the last 4 digits of your social security number and confirming recent transactions. CenterState representatives will NEVER ask you for personal account information other than those confirming your identity.

 09/09/11 -- Fraudulent Emails Claiming to be from NACHA (Phishing Alert Update 3/29/2011)
http://www.nacha.org/news/newsDetail.cfm/RecentBusinessNewsID/220

08/11/11 -- Canadian Lottery Scam: There is a "NEW" Canadian Lottery scam featuring U.S. Postal Service Money orders. This scam made the rounds several years ago but used fake corporate checks.

Here is how it works: The victim receives an official looking letter congratulating them on winning the Canadian Lottery. There is a fake USPS Money order included as an advance on the winnings. The advance money is to be used to pay the fees required to have the winnings "processed". The instructions tell the victim to deposit the money in their account and immediately wire most of it to an account specified in the letter.

I am sure that you can guess the result. The check is fraudulent and bounces and since the money was wired to the crooks, the victims are out the money.

Click here for a handy checklist to help identify fake money orders. If you are not sure of the authenticity of a Money Order, call 1-866-459-7822 for verification.

If you have received a check that is related to a sweepstakes or lottery, do not accept or try to cash the check. Call the Postal Inspection Service at 877-876-2455. It is mail fraud and they will investigate it.

08/05/11 -- Debit/Credit Card Skimmers - Click here for article

07/21/10 -- Microsoft Lottery Faud
There have been calls from people around the country saying that they have received an e-mail telling them they have won the “Microsoft Lottery”.

This is a phishing hoax in which CenterState Bank has been referenced as the bank that is “holding the winnings”. The crooks are hoping that the recipients of the bogus e-mails will fax or e-mail their credit card or banking information to the crooks, thinking that the crooks will then transfer the “winnings”.

Instead, the crooks access the victims accounts and steal their money.
This is a scam, please do NOT send, fax or give their personal information to anyone you do not know. M
ore information on the “Microsoft Lottery” scam can be found here: http://www.microsoft.com/protect/lottery/whatis.aspx

06/26/10 -- Beware Text Message Phishing Attempt

There have been several cell phone text messages reported that state some type of alert prompting a call. These messages have been coming to our customers as well as non-customers.

The message then requests that recipients call a phone number or go to a website. Responding to this will take you to a voice mail system or website that asks you for credit card and other information that can be used to steal your identity.

If you see a message like this on your cell phone do not reply by texting, and do not call the phone number listed.

If you believe you've been scammed, file your complaint at ftc.gov, and then visit the FTC's Identity Theft website at consumer.gov/idtheft.

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When you hear the term phishing your first thought might be "fishing" a relaxing sport many enjoy today. Unfortunately this type of "phishing" it is not a relaxing sport for anyone.

Webopedia defines "phishing" as the act of sending an e-mail to a user falsely claiming to be an established legitimate enterprise in an attempt to scam the user into surrendering private information that will be used for identity theft.

The email directs the user to visit a Web site where they are asked to update personal information, such as passwords and credit card, social security, and bank account numbers, that the legitimate organization already has.

The Web site however, is bogus and set up only to steal the user’s information. Because it is relatively simple to make a Web site look like a legitimate organizations site by mimicking the HTML code, the scam counts on people being tricked into thinking they were actually being contacted by a legitimate company and are subsequently going to a bogus site to update their account information.

By spamming large groups of people, the "phisher" counts on the e-mail being read by a percentage of people who actually have listed credit card numbers with the company they are portraying.

The best way to protect yourself from this type of scam is to never give out personal information by email or phone if you have not initiated the request.

It is unfortunate that we have to be concerned with issues such as these but your best defense is that of knowledge. Listed below are some additional Web sites you can visit for more information on "phishing" and who to contact for reporting suspected phishers.

Home of the Anti-Phishing Working Group
www.antiphishing.org

How Not To Get Hooked By A Phishing Scam
www.ftc.gov/bcp/conline/pubs/alerts/phishingalrt.htm

Better Business Bureau Phishing Phacts
www.bbb.org/phishing/

Department of Justice’s Web Resources On Identity Theft and Identity Fraud
www.usdoj.gov/criminal/fraud/idtheft.html

Where Do Customers Go For HELP?

If a customer suspects they have given information to a phishers, it is important for them to act immediately. For information on how a customer can put a "fraud alert" on their files at the credit reporting bureaus, and for other advise for ID theft victims, contact the Federal Trade Commission’s ID Theft Clearinghouse at:

www.consumer.gov/idtheft or call 1-877-438-4338

Report any phishing ATTEMPTS by contacting the National Fraud Information Center/Internet Fraud Watch. Alert the company the phisher was impersonating, and their local law enforcement agency.

www.fraud.org or call 1-800-876-7060